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Townsend Security Data Privacy Blog

Case Study: Citizens Security Life Insurance

Posted by Luke Probasco on Mar 13, 2017 10:54:24 AM

CSLI-Logo.pngCompliance Made Easy - Protecting Private Information with Alliance AES/400 Encryption for IBM i and Alliance Key Manager for VMware


“Townsend Security was extremely easy to work with - from the sales process to deploying our proof of concept to post-sales support.”

- Adam Bell, Senior Director of IT

 
Citizens Security Life Insurance

MCitizens Security Life Insurance Company is a life and health insurance carrier. The company offers group benefits including dental and vision coverage, and individual ancillary insurance products. The company was founded in 1965 and is headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky.

The Challenge: Protect ePHI & PII on the IBM i

In order to meet growing partner requirements and pass a data security audit for protecting electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI) and Personally Identifiable Information (PII), Citizens Security Life Insurance (CSLI) needed to deploy an encryption solution on the IBM i. The solution needed to be easy to implement with excellent performance.

While FIELDPROC on the IBM i makes it very easy to encrypt data without application changes, CSLI also understood that for encrypted data to truly be secure, they would need to store and manage encryption keys with an external key manager.

By using a VMware-based encryption key manager, the company could meet encryption and key management best practices for separating encryption keys from the data they protect.

The Solutions

Alliance AES/400 Encryption

“The performance we are seeing with Alliance AES/400 encryption is excellent,” said Adam Bell, Senior Director of IT, Citizens Security Life Insurance. “The solution was easy to integrate and completely met our expectations.”

Alliance AES/400 FIELDPROC encryption is NIST-compliant and optimized for performance. The solution is up to 100x faster than equivalent IBM APIs on the IBM i platform.

With Alliance AES/400, businesses can encrypt and decrypt fields that store data such as credit card numbers, social security numbers, account numbers, ePHI, and other PII instantly without application changes.

Alliance Key Manager for VMware

Alliance Key Manager for VMWare was very easy to implement and the resources Townsend Security provided made deployment a smooth process,” continued Bell. By deploying Alliance Key Manager for VMware, CSLI was able to meet their business needs with a solution that could not only deploy quickly, but was also easy to set up and configure.

Alliance Key Manager for VMware leverages the same FIPS 140-2 compliant technology found in Townsend Security’s hardware security module (HSM) and in use by over 3,000 customers. The solution brings a proven and mature encryption key management solution to VMware environments, with a lower total cost of ownership. Additionally, the key manager has been validated to meet PCI DSS in VMware environments.

Integration with the IBM i Platform

An encryption strategy is only as good as the key management strategy, and it can be difficult to get key management right. For companies doing encryption, the most common cause of an audit failure is an improper implementation of key management. The seamless integration between Alliance AES/400 and the external Alliance Key Manager for VMware allowed CSLI to pass their data security audit with flying colors.

“The relationship we developed with Townsend Security enabled us to have a painless sales and support process, and in turn, enabled us to easily pass our data security audit,” finished Bell.

Meeting HIPAA and protecting ePHI with encryption and key management.

 

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Alliance AES/400, Case Study

AES Encryption Performance on the IBM i (AS/400, iSeries):

Posted by Michelle Larson on Feb 8, 2016 7:39:00 AM

Understanding the basics can help you avoid problems! 

As enterprise customers deploy data security solutions to meet various compliance regulations (PCI DSS, HIPAA, etc.), they are frequently surprised by the performance impacts of encryption. Inadequate preparation in an encryption project can lead to increased costs, delayed (or even failed) projects, inability to meet compliance requirements, and even exposure in the event of a data breach.AES Encryption 30-day free trial

By its very nature, encryption and decryption are resource intensive processes. Enterprise customers can be surprised to discover that encryption from one vendor can perform very differently than the very same encryption from another vendor. While the various vendor solutions accomplish the same tasks, they vary greatly in how efficiently they do these tasks. The differences can vary by a factor of 100 or greater! This can have a large impact on business applications that perform encryption and decryption tasks. One vendor’s solution may encrypt a data in 10 minutes, and another vendor’s solution may take 10 hours to perform the same task!

Avoid surprises, ask for performance metrics:

Armed with the knowledge that encryption performance is important, you can take action to avoid potential problems. Before acquiring an encryption solution, ask your data security vendor to provide performance metrics for their solution. How long does it take to encrypt one million credit card numbers? Can they provide you with source code and demonstrate this performance on your server? Optimizing software for performance is a complex task and usually involves specialized technical talent and some experimentation with different computational techniques. Unless an encryption vendor is deeply committed and invested in encryption technologies, they may not make performance enhancements to their applications.

Create your own proof-of-concept applications that measure encryption and decryption performance in your application environment. Be sure to measure how well the encryption solution performs under your current transaction loads, as well as anticipated future transaction loads. A good rule of thumb is to be sure you can handle three times your current encryption volume. This will position you for increased loads due to unexpected changes in the market, or an acquisition of another company. It also insures that you are seeing real-life performance metrics, and not just the vendor’s marketing message.

Avoid hidden costs, ask for pricing calculations:

Ask your purchasing and accounting departments to include performance upgrade costs in the pricing calculation during vendor evaluation. Be sure these costs include any increases in software license fees. If an encryption solution consumes one third of the CPU processing power of a server, you might want to include the cost of upgrading to a processor twice as powerful as the one you have. Working these costs in during the product evaluation phase can provide a more realistic view of the actual cost of a vendor encryption solution. Upgrading hardware can lead to unexpected additional software costs. Some software vendors license their solutions to the number of processors, or speed of the processors, in your server. Upgrading hardware to solve a performance problem can result in increased software license fees.

Avoid red flags, not all AES encryption solutions are the same:

Some encryption solutions use “shadow files” (files external to your application) to store encrypted data. The use of shadow files normally indicates that the vendor has an incomplete implementation of the AES encryption suite, or that the system architecture is limited in some way. The use of shadow files can impose severe performance penalties. In order to perform an encryption or decryption task an addition file read or write is required which essentially doubles the file activity. This may also increase processor loads as your application mirrors the data to a hot backup system. You will want to be very careful in measuring the performance impacts of encryption solutions that use shadow files.

If an encryption vendor will not provide you with a fully functional evaluation of their solution, this represents a clear warning signal. Your application environment is unique and you will need to be able to evaluate the impact of encryption in your environment with a limited test. A vendor who refuses to provide you with a clear method of evaluating the performance of their solution may not have your best interests in mind.

Avoid frustrations, take a test drive with us:

Despite an organization’s best efforts, data will get out. The best way to secure sensitive information is with strong encryption that is NIST compliant and FIPS 140-2 compliant key management that meets or exceeds the standards in PCI, HIPAA/HITECH, and state privacy laws. For a more technical look at AES encryption, including FieldProc exit points and POWER8 on-board encryption, check out this blog by Patrick Townsend, Founder and CEO of Townsend Security: How Does IBM i FieldProc Encryption Affect Performance?

Our proven AES encryption solution encrypts data 115x times faster than the competition. But don’t just take our word for it, we provide a fully functional evaluation!  Request a free 30-day trial (full version) of our popular Alliance AES Encryption and see for yourself.

AES Encryption 30-day free trial

Topics: Alliance AES/400, IBM i, AES Encryption, iSeries, AS/400, Evaluation

Can I Encrypt Key Fields (Indexes) with IBM i FieldProc?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Oct 6, 2015 1:50:00 PM

IBM introduced the DB2 Field Procedures (FieldProc) column level encryption interface in V7R1 of the operating system. It has been a great way for IBM i (iSeries, AS/400) customers to protect sensitive data in their DB2 for i files and tables, but customers often have questions about how this new capability works. One of the most common questions is “Can I encrypt index fields and will they work correctly?”

FIELDPROC EncryptionThe answer to the first part of the question is YES you can encrypt index fields, and the answer to the second part of the question is THAT DEPENDS. Let’s take a deeper look at encrypted indexes with FieldProc.

First, let’s look at DB2 FieldProc strictly from a SQL point of view. Remember that SQL is IBM’s preferred interface to the DB2 relational database. So let’s start there:

The first thing to understand is that FieldProc is fundamentally a SQL construct. That is, it is designed for and implemented as a SQL facility. You can specify a FieldProc program on the SQL CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE commands, but you can’t specify FieldProc on traditional DDS source descriptions. FieldProc works great on index fields in your SQL applications! Your SQL statements will work just as you would hope and you will have a great new facility for implementing automatic encryption. With very few limitations you will find that encrypted indexes work without any issues for your SQL applications. I’ve rarely found a customer who was unhappy with IBM’s implementation of FieldProc in native SQL applications. This includes SQLRPG applications that use native SQL for the database interface.

But, of course, most IBM i customers are running a lot of legacy RPG or COBOL applications that do not use SQL. And this is where there are some significant restrictions on encrypted indexes.

First, you CAN use FieldProc on traditional database files created with DDS. It is not necessary to convert the database files to SQL in order to use FieldProc. Of course, FieldProc application support is installed using SQL statements, but they will work on traditional DDS created files with some minor limitations. So this part is not complicated.

Next, you CAN encrypt indexes that are created with DDS. However, you do have some significant limitations when using FieldProc with DDS files. For example, some join logical files that join on encrypted index fields will not work. You simply won’t be able to create join logical files that link using fields encrypted under FieldProc.

A more fundamental problem is that legacy RPG and COBOL applications will not work correctly with most encrypted indexes. Since the legacy file interface is not SQL, the legacy applications will not work as expected in many cases. For example, it is very common to use the Set Lower Limits (SETLL) command with the Read (READ) command to read a range of values in a table. In these legacy applications the SETLL value will be converted to the encrypted value by FieldProc, and then the next record will be read using the encrypted key value. But encrypted values will not be in the same order as the original plaintext values. This will lead to empty subfiles and empty or incorrect information on reports.

For many IBM i customers the limitations on encrypted indexes are not a big problem and they live with them. For many others encrypted indexes with legacy RPG applications is a significant problem that will make the use of FieldProc impossible.

Is there a solution for this problem? Well, of course you can convert all of your legacy databases and applications to SQL databases and SQL RPG applications, or even to native SQL applications. But this represents a major investment by many customers. But there is an alternative provided in the Open Access for RPG (OAR) implementation by IBM.

The Open Access for RPG implementation allows you to define a handler for file operations using one F specification in your RPG program. With this implementation the legacy file operations are handled by your new handler application. And that can be a set of SQL functions! This means that a legacy RPG program can become enabled for true SQL operations with a simple change and re-compile of the application. Of course, you must have the SQL handler functions ready to take over the file operations. I won’t go into creating SQL handlers in this blog, but be aware that creating SQL handlers is not for the faint of heart. You need to have extensive experience with SQL and understand the OAR architecture. If you’ve not done this before the IBM Lab Services team can provide assistance.

In summary, FieldProc is a great new facility and it is already helping a lot of IBM i DB2 customers to protect data with strong encryption. It works great with native SQL applications, but you need to be aware of some limitations when used with legacy RPG and COBOL applications.

Our Alliance AES/400 solution provides everything you need to implement FieldProc. 

IBM i FIELDPROC Encryption

Topics: Alliance AES/400, IBM i, AES Encryption

How Does Data Masking Work with FieldProc Automatic Encryption

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Sep 29, 2015 8:24:00 AM

Many compliance regulations such as PCI-DSS and HIPAA require that data be completely hidden or partially masked for all users who are not authorized to see the data. When IBM i (AS/400, iSeries) customers implement DB2 Field Procedure (FieldProc) encryption, how do they implement data masking at the same time? In this blog I want to talk about general principles of data masking, how IBM DB2 FieldProc applications can implement data masking, and some limitations that you need to know.

Data Masking and the FieldProc Architecture
IBM i FIELDPROC WebinarThere is no direct facility provided by IBM in the DB2 FieldProc architecture to implement data masking for you. This means that your FieldProc application must implement this for you. FieldProc applications are written by you or provided by your vendor (see below for information about the Townsend Security solution). Since data masking is designed to protect sensitive data in the clear, this means that data masking should be implemented in the decryption logic. When a row is read from a database table the FieldProc application is called by DB2 to perform decryption. At that point the determination must be made on whether the user is allowed to see the entire column value in the clear, whether it should be partially masked, or whether it should be fully masked. 

Data Masking Security Architecture 

One of the core security principles of data masking is that it should be based on user whitelists and not on user object authority. This is not an intuitive idea for most IBM i system administrators because so much of IBM i security is based on file object level authorities. So why would data masking not rely on object authority?

One of the main efforts of a cyber criminal upon gaining access to your system to escalate their privilege level in order to access sensitive data and achieve the ability to manipulate system configurations. On the IBM i platform the attacker will try to gain security administrator privilege or All Object (*ALLOBJ) authority. If your data masking strategy is based on object authority it is immediately defeated when the attacker gains greater privilege. This is why data masking should be based on a whitelist approach and not on native object authorities, and why we took this approach in our Alliance AES/400 FieldProc implementation. 

Users and Groups
Like many other operating systems the IBM i provides for user groups. On the IBM i platform user groups are defined by a Group Profile, and individual users can belong to this group or it can be included in their supplemental group. Group profiles are a convenient way for IBM i security administrators to define authority rights for anyone in the group and not have to define these rights for each individual user. If you are a user you inherit the rights to the groups you belong to. A data masking implementation should incorporate user groups into its implementation through a whitelist approach.

Data Masking Options
Data masking options should allow for masking of an entire field, or just a portion of the field. The PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is probably most clear on data masking requirements for compliance. Only authorized users (defined by PCI as “personnel with a legitimate business need can see the full PAN”) should see an entire field unmasked and all others should see only a portion of the field (The first six and/or last four digits) or the field should be fully masked. When establishing your whitelist of users you should be able to define the data masking options at the same time as you define the user or the group.

Data Masking for Numeric Fields
On the IBM i platform we have a challenge when it comes to masking numeric fields. Numeric fields can only contain a numeric digit and can’t contain an asterisk or other typical masking character. For numeric fields you must determine a masking pattern that can’t naturally occur in the data. Perhaps you could choose a masking option that filled a numeric field with all 9’s. This would work if the field could not naturally contain all 9’s. An example might be a salary field. If you have a 9.2 zoned numeric field it is unlikely that anyone would have a salary equal to $9,999,999.99 and masking with all 9’s would work. Just be aware that masking numeric fields requires some forethought and planning.

Limitations and Gotchas
Data masking with FieldProc encryption is generally very effective and easy to do. But there are a few limitations. Consider a program that reads data from table A and uses a column value to read a record from table B. And assume that the value read from table A is encrypted. If a user can only see masked data, the data will be masked when read from table A and the lookup on table B will fail. This is a subtle limitation but it has occurred in the real world!

Summary
Data masking is a powerful additional security control for your FieldProc applications. If you are aware of the limitations it is a great tool to help you get better security for your IBM i databases and applications.

IBM i FieldProc encryption by Townsend Security
Townsend Security provides a full IBM DB2 FieldProc solution for the IBM i server platform with Alliance AES/400. In addition to strong 256-bit AES encryption, it provides IBM i customers with flexible data masking options on decryption. It has full support for individual and group profiles, and the security administrator can specify a default masking rule to apply to any users not explicitly allowed to see unmasked or partially masked data.

FIELDPROC Encryption IBM i

Topics: Alliance AES/400, FIELDPROC

How Does IBM i FieldProc Encryption Affect Performance?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Sep 14, 2015 8:49:00 AM

IBM i (AS/400, iSeries) customers have a great automatic encryption option with DB2 Field Procedures, or “FieldProc”. As with any encryption facility, users always have questions and concerns about performance. Performance impacts extend beyond just the impact of encryption itself, so let’s look at various aspects of performance when it comes to IBM i FieldProc.

IBM FieldProc Architecture
IBM i FIELDPROC WebinarOne of the largest impacts on performance comes from the actual architecture of FieldProc itself. IBM DB2 FieldProc is basically implemented as an event-driven exit point at the column level. What this means is that any insert, read, or update operation will trigger a dynamic program call to the FieldProc application program to perform encryption or decryption. There is definitely a performance penalty for this architecture. An application program that reads a large database on a modern IBM i server may be able to process hundreds of thousands of records per second. With FieldProc, that may be reduced to tens of thousands of records per second as the FieldProc program is invoked for each row in the table. You can still get good performance with FieldProc enabled (read on), but there will be an impact.


FieldProc Program Performance and Optimization
A FieldProc program is just an application program that you create or that your encryption vendor provides to you, so it can have its own performance issues. How much file I/O does the FieldProc program perform for each encryption or decryption task? How optimized is the application code? How optimized is the compilation of the program? Does the program perform any caching of internal information to improve performance? Like any program on any platform or operating system, a FieldProc program may perform well or not.

Encryption Performance
Surprisingly, there can be really big differences in the performance of encryption libraries even when doing the same type of encryption. You might think that 256-bit AES would have the same performance regardless of the vendor. And you would be really wrong about that. On the IBM i server platform I’ve seen a difference of more than 100 times between two different 256-bit AES encryption libraries. To put this in a practical context, this is the difference between 10 hours of batch processing versus 5 minutes of batch processing. That’s pretty dramatic. Encryption libraries can be optimized and should be optimized for performance. That is not always the case.

Number of Columns Under Encryption Control
The number of columns in a table will affect the performance of your FieldProc implementation. If you have three columns in a table under FieldProc control you will definitely see an impact on performance compared to a single column. Each read of a row in the table will result in three separate calls to a FieldProc program to perform decryption. This is not a linear impact on performance. That is, you won’t see an impact on the order of three times the impact of one column under FieldProc control. But there is a gradual impact as you add columns in the table. By the way, FieldProc will be called for each column even if your application does not use the column.

Encryption Key Management
Using encryption means using encryption keys. Assuming that you are not using a poor security practice such as storing the key on the same server as the encrypted data, the interface to your key management server represents another potential performance impact. How keys are retrieved and prepared for use by the encryption software can represent a hidden drag on performance. While a single key retrieval from a key server may take just a few milliseconds, the performance impact can be dramatic when thousands or millions of key retrievals are needed from a key server.

Encryption Key Caching
Because encryption key retrieval can slow the overall encryption process, it is important that a FieldProc application use secure key caching logic to minimize the number of key retrieval operations. If your nightly processing retrieves 10 million records for reporting, you definitely don’t want to retrieve encryption keys 10 million times. A good FieldProc implementation should securely cache encryption keys. This means that keys should not be exposed in program dumps or debug mode of operation.

CPU Performance
IBM i servers vary a great deal in CPU performance and the number of processors that are available to applications. Entry level servers may have a single processor that is shared between multiple partitions. High end IBM i servers can have a large number of processors and rival Mainframes in raw processing power. This will definitely have an impact on encryption performance. The number of processors is less important than the power of each processor. It sometimes surprises IBM i customers that adding a processor to a system might have minimal impact on encryption performance. But upgrading to a faster processor can make a big difference. Also, more modern IBM i servers have very powerful POWER7 and POWER8 chips and these will help with encryption performance.

POWER8 On-Board Encryption
The new IBM POWER8 systems now have built-in support for AES encryption. This is similar to the Intel AES-NI implementation. While this does provide some improvement in encryption performance, it won’t be as much as you might expect. The built-in chip support for AES encryption seems to be optimized for encrypting very large chunks of data at one time. If you are encrypting a credit card number of social security number, you won’t see a really dramatic improvement in performance. IBM i customers using ASP encryption should really benefit from the built-in encryption. In some cases such as with Townsend Security's Alliance AES/400 encryption for IBM i, the software implementation provides big performance advantages over the on-chip POWER8 implementation.

Native SQL Applications
As most IBM i customers know, IBM has been on a tear to improve SQL in DB2 for some time. We’ve seen increasingly better performance of SQL applications over time. In the current release of the IBM i operating system and DB2 database the performance of SQL is impressive. Because SQL performs better, you will see better performance when implementing FieldProc in native SQL applications. Of course, you don’t need to convert your databases from DDS to DDL/SQL to use FieldProc, but if you do you will see better overall performance.

IBM i Navigator and SQL Plan Cache
When discussing database performance it is always important to mention the IBM i Navigator SQL Plan Cache function. This application comes with every IBM i server and is always available. It can show you how well your DB2 applications are performing, and can even recommend steps you can take to improve performance! When using FieldProc it can be a very helpful tool.

More about Townsend Security’s AES/400 FieldProc Solution for IBM i DB2
The Townsend Security solution for FieldProc encryption is called Alliance AES/400. It is the fastest performing FieldProc solution in the market and implements all of the FieldProc recommendations above. 

FIELDPROC Encryption IBM i

Topics: Encryption, Alliance AES/400, FIELDPROC

What You Need To Know About Encryption & EU Data Privacy Protections!

Posted by Michelle Larson on Sep 16, 2014 2:31:00 PM

Here is a sneak peek at the introduction for the latest regulatory guidance white paper from Townsend Security. For detailed information, download the entire document:Download the EU Data Privacy White Paper

On March 25, 2014, the Article 29 Data Protection Working Party of the European Union issued new guidance on data breach notification and the use of data protection technologies such as encryption and encryption key management. Extending beyond just Internet Service Providers, the new regulations cover all organizations that process, store, or transmit private information of EU citizens. Along with these new regulations, there are substantial financial penalties for failing to protect sensitive information. These penalties can reach into the 10’s of millions of Euros depending on the organization’s size and amount of data compromised.

The European Union does not mandate that all organizations immediately encrypt sensitive data, but the only exclusion for subject data breach notification and financial penalties will be for those organizations who use encryption and other security methods to protect the data. Applying these security methods after a breach will not remove the notification requirements and penalties.

EU Data Protection Directive (also known as Directive 95/46/EC) is a directive adopted by the European Union designed to protect the privacy and protection of all personal data collected for or about citizens of the EU, especially as it relates to processing, using, or exchanging such data. The following guidelines will help meet these new EU objectives:

Encrypt Data at Rest

Make a full inventory of all sensitive personal information that you collect and store. Use strong encryption to protect this data on servers, PCs, laptops, tablets, mobile devices, and on backups. Personal data should always be encrypted as it flows through your systems, and when you transmit it to outside organizations.

Use Industry Standard Encryption

Use industry standard encryption such as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES, also known as Rijndael). AES is recognized world-wide as the leading standard for data encryption. Never use home-grown or non-standard encryption algorithms.

Use Strong Encryption Keys

Always use cryptographically secure 128-bit and 256- bit AES encryption keys and never use passwords as encryption keys or the basis for creating encryption keys. Encryption keys based on passwords will never meet minimum standards for strong encryption keys. Keys should be generated using a cryptographically secure random bit generator (CS-RBG) validated to international standards.

Protect Encryption Keys from Loss

Encryption keys must be stored away from the data they protect and must be securely managed. Manual procedures cannot accomplish the goal of proper encryption key management. Use a professional encryption key management solution to protect keys and provide different keys for different data protection needs. Key management solutions should implement key creation, management, and distribution and be compliant with the NIST FIPS 140-2 standard recognized and accepted worldwide.

Change Encryption Keys Regularly

Using one encryption key for a long period of time can expose you to a breach notification for historical data. Change your encryption keys on a quarterly or semi-annual basis. A good key management solution can automatically change encryption keys at an interval you define.

Use Strong, Industry Standard Hash Algorithms

Use strong, industry standard secure hash algorithms when protecting passwords and other information. Never use MD5 or other weaker hash methods. Use the SHA-256 or SHA-512 methods for your hash requirements.

Use Keys or Salt with Your Hashes

When using a strong secure hash algorithm, always use an encryption key or random salt to strengthen the resulting hash value. You can use the Hashed Message Authentication Code (HMAC) method with an encryption key or use a strong encryption key under the protection of a key manager as the salt for the hash method.

For details on the EU Data Protection Directive...


Click to Request the EU Data Privacy White Paper

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Compliance, Encryption, Alliance AES/400, EU Data Privacy Protection, Encryption Key Management, White Paper, Salting, AES Encryption, Hashing

5 Common FAQs About IBM i Encryption Using FIELDPROC

Posted by Victor Oprescu on Mar 4, 2014 8:22:00 AM

With V7R1 IBM introduced FIELDPROC (field procedure) exit points which Alliance AES400 for IBM i uses to encrypt database files at a field level. Since the cryptographic process is called by the database directly upon access, rather than by the application, this means that the process will work regardless of what type of application uses it. No application changes are needed, which is something our customers really like to hear.

FIELDPROC EncryptionThese are five frequently asked questions we get around FIELDPROC encryption.

1. What type of fields are supported with FIELDPROC?

Surprisingly, virtually every field type is supported, whether it is character (even binary character), numeric (zoned, packed or binary) date, time, timestamp, Double Byte Character Set (DBCS), and hex. Some fields have certain restrictions, for example in order to implement fieldproc encryption on date, time, and timestamp fields you must specify a default value that is not ‘current date and time’.  You can define this in DDS or structured query language (SQL), and there is an option in the DB2/400 FIELDPROC encryption menu that will do this for you.

FIELDPROC will also handle blank fields by not encrypting them at all. This helps us achieve better results from certain SQL operations. FIELDPROC encryption however does not support fields with NULL values and they should be avoided or changed if necessary.

2. Will I need to make any changes to my applications?

As I mentioned above, it is not necessary to make application changes, but here is more detail as to why: In V7R1, AES/400 can create FIELDPROC exit points that tie to individual fields in a DB/2 file. When a file is opened for any operation, read, update, insert, or delete, the exit point calls one of our FIELDPROC applications, which calls our encryption or decryption APIs. It does this regardless of which application is accessing the file, thus creating application independent encryption.

A few things to consider are: when you backup your file you will need to also backup the FIELDPROC applications, and make sure you restore them at the same time as well. It is also important to remember that if the file is accessed through FTP it will be transferred in the clear.

3. Can I encrypt index fields?

In short, yes. However, encrypting index fields will affect the performance of your SQL operations, and the more indexes you encrypt, the more your performance will be affected. This happens primarily for the following reason: For faster performance DB/2 looks up records based on their encrypted values. This means that when you tell DB/2 you are looking for the record with social security number 111223333, and that field is encrypted, it will encrypt the search string and then retrieve the matching record for you. This is done as a performance enhancement especially when working with logical files on the IBM i. However for some SQL operations it decrypts all the records in order to read the index fields, so rather than encrypting single values to look up, it needs to decrypt a multitude of records.

4. What kind of performance can I expect?

In our test environment, which consists of a single processor IBM i platform, model 515, approximately 3500 CPW, V7R1 of the operating system with TR5 installed, we can process about 16,000 records per second. Systems with higher processing power should see better performance. This means that if we have a file with one million records and one field encrypted we can read the entire file in about 60 seconds. If they are 2 fields encrypted it will take us about 120 seconds because we are handling two million decryption calls.

5. Does using external key management affect performance?

In short, no. The time it takes AES/400 to retrieve a symmetric encryption key from our Alliance Key Manager server is approximately 0.0116 seconds. And this is through a secure TLS connection. There are network infrastructures in which this time may be slightly affected, firewalls, routers, switches, distance, however it should never create a noticeable difference in performance.

To learn more about automatic encryption on IBM i V7R1 using FIELDPROC, download the podcast "FIELDPROC Encryption on the IBM i" to hear IBM i security experts Patrick Botz and Patrick Townsend discuss encryption, key management, and meeting compliance regulations on the IBM i.

IBM i FIELDPROC Encryption

Topics: Encryption, Alliance AES/400, IBM i, automatic encryption, FIELDPROC

AES Encryption Performance

Posted by Luke Probasco on Apr 12, 2011 8:48:00 AM

AES Encryption Performance: Avoid the High Cost of Poorly Performing Encryption Solutions

AES EncryptionAES encryption has become the de facto standard for protecting data at rest in databases and unstructured data such as flat files, messages, EDI, and XML documents.  As enterprises deploy data security solutions to meet compliance requirements, they are frequently surprised by the performance impacts of encryption. Inadequate attention to encryption performance can lead to increased costs, delayed or failed projects, compliance failure, reduced flexibility to meet competitive challenges, and exposure to legal liability.

Whether you're evaluating an encryption solution or already encrypting data, these tips about encryption and performance will help ensure you have the right solution in place. 

Encryption - A Resource Hungry Application

By its very nature, encryption and decryption are resource intensive processes. Encrypting a simple credit card number requires many thousands of computer instructions. These instructions merge the input data with an encryption key using a large number of computer instructions to produce the secured data (called the “cipher text”). Because of the large number of computer instructions, an enterprise customer will experience increased utilization of computer resources and a need to consider adding additional capacity.

Ask for performance metrics

Armed with the knowledge that encryption performance is important, you can take action to avoid potential problems. Before acquiring an encryption solution, ask your data security vendor to provide performance metrics for their solution. How long does it take to encrypt one million credit card numbers? Can they provide you with source code and demonstrate this performance on your server?

The Hidden Costs of Encryption

Poorly performing encryption solutions can come with steep price tags as you secure more data in more places. You may have to add additional memory and increase the number of processors to handle the demands of encryption. As you upgrade your server hardware, the operating system vendor and application software vendors may increase the license fees they charge for their software. These cost increases may ripple through your backup and high availability systems. On top of increased hardware and software, your human resource costs also increase as you deploy larger and more powerful servers.

Are Network Encryption Devices a Good Idea?

Some security vendors provide encryption solutions on an external server as an encryption appliance. Each time your application needs to encrypt or decrypt data, a connection to the server is created and the data is transferred to the server for the encryption operation. Be sure to understand the maximum encryption rate of these types of appliances when doing a large number of operations. if it takes 5 milliseconds to transfer data to a server for encryption,
and 5 milliseconds to return the encrypted data, that 10 milliseconds can represent a performance problem.

Test Drive - not all AES encryption solutions are the same

Townsend Security's proven AES encryption solution encrypts data 94x times faster than the competition.   Request a free 30-day trial of our popular Alliance AES Encryption and see for yourself.

But don't just take our word for it, read what Staples has to say about their experience with our AES encpryption solution.

Case Study

AES PerformanceA large multi-brand retailer, that sells its products online and in traditional retail outlets needed to meet PCI Data Security Standards for protecting customer credit card information. After evaluating several different vendors for performance they decided on AES Encryption from Townsend Security.  They deployed the Alliance AES/400 Encryption solution to protect sensitive data in DB2 database files and in a variety of unstructured data files and were able to achieve PCI compliance in record time.

Townsend Security Can Help

The best way to secure sensitive information is with strong encryption and key management. Townsend Security provides NIST validated encryption and logging solutions for the enterprise. Our encryption, key management, tokenization, and logging solutions protect sensitive data from loss, whether it is at rest or in motion.  With NIST validated and FIPS 140-2 compliant certified solutions, Townsend Security meets or exceeds the standards in PCI, HIPAA/HITECH, and state privacy laws.  Click here to download a free 30-day trial of our popular Alliance AES Encryption.

Topics: NIST, Alliance AES/400, Encryption Key Management, Case Study, Performance, FIPS-140, AES Encryption

Data Privacy in a De-Perimeterized World

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Feb 25, 2011 8:33:00 AM
De-perimeterizationI just listened to a discussion of database security hosted by Oracle that was very well done. At one point the discussion turned to current threats and how the Enterprise has lost the ability to use perimeter protection for sensitive data. This has been a topic of much discussion in the security area for the last few months. Perimeter protection is based on the use of Firewall and similar technologies to keep the bad guys out, but this approach is failing with the advance of more sophisticated attacks, the use of social media by large organizations, the advance of mobile technologies, insider threats, and the migration of applications to cloud platforms. The trend is called “de-perimeterization” and represents a bit of a challenge to organizations that need to protect sensitive data.

Vipin Samir and Nishant Kaushik did a great job of describing the how the process of de-perimeterization has forced companies to fall back on user access controls to protect data. But user access controls are notoriously weak.  Weak passwords and sophisticated password cracking routines make it almost impossible to properly secure a database. So what is a security administrator to do?

Here are the suggestions from the panel that are a part of a defense-in-depth strategy:

Use Encryption to Protect Data:
Companies should use encryption at the database level or column level to protect data. This will secure data at rest on backup tapes and on disk in the event a drive is replaced. Encryption is an important part of the data protection strategy, but it needs to be combined with other techniques.

Use Good Key Management:
Protecting encryption keys is the most important part of the encryption strategy. Good key management techniques are needed, and the keys must be separated from the data they protect. Without this separation from protected data it is impossible to implement separation of duties and dual control – important parts of the key management strategy. See our Alliance Key Manager solution for more information about securing encryption keys.

Separation of Duties:
Because the threat from insiders is rising, it is important that the management of encryption keys be separate from the management of databases. Database administrators responsible for our relational databases should not have access to encryption key management, and security administrators should not manage databases. This is a core principal in data security regulations such as PCI DSS, but is often overlooked.

Context Sensitive Controls and Monitoring:
The last important step is to be sure that data access controls are sensitive to the data and its context. Bill in shipping has access to the order database, but should he really be decrypting the credit card number? Does your encryption solution detect and block this type of event? How will you monitor this security event? Or, Sally is authorized to view HR data from the accounting application, but should she really be using FTP to transfer this data? Normal encryption functions would not provide adequate protection from these types of data access. Context sensitive controls are needed to augment encryption.

When we started planning for automatic encryption in our Alliance AES/400 product two years ago, we took care to implement context sensitive controls right in the decryption APIs. That is now available in V7R1 of the IBM i operating system. We avoided the error of basing these controls on user account authorities and native OS security. Just because the operating system says you have read access rights to a database table, doesn’t mean you should be decrypting the social security number or using FTP to transfer the file. I’m happy with our implementation that is based on explicit authorization by a security administrator, and application white lists.

You can get more information and request an evaluation version of our Alliance AES/400 solution here.

You can find the Oracle presentation here. Look for “How secure is your Enterprise Application Data?”

Patrick

Topics: Key Management, De-Perimeterization, Oracle, Separation of Duties, Alliance AES/400, Encryption Key Management, Defense-in-Depth, automatic encryption, AES Encryption

 

 

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