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Townsend Security Data Privacy Blog

Case Study: Citizens Security Life Insurance

Posted by Luke Probasco on Mar 13, 2017 10:54:24 AM

CSLI-Logo.pngCompliance Made Easy - Protecting Private Information with Alliance AES/400 Encryption for IBM i and Alliance Key Manager for VMware


“Townsend Security was extremely easy to work with - from the sales process to deploying our proof of concept to post-sales support.”

- Adam Bell, Senior Director of IT

 
Citizens Security Life Insurance

MCitizens Security Life Insurance Company is a life and health insurance carrier. The company offers group benefits including dental and vision coverage, and individual ancillary insurance products. The company was founded in 1965 and is headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky.

The Challenge: Protect ePHI & PII on the IBM i

In order to meet growing partner requirements and pass a data security audit for protecting electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI) and Personally Identifiable Information (PII), Citizens Security Life Insurance (CSLI) needed to deploy an encryption solution on the IBM i. The solution needed to be easy to implement with excellent performance.

While FIELDPROC on the IBM i makes it very easy to encrypt data without application changes, CSLI also understood that for encrypted data to truly be secure, they would need to store and manage encryption keys with an external key manager.

By using a VMware-based encryption key manager, the company could meet encryption and key management best practices for separating encryption keys from the data they protect.

The Solutions

Alliance AES/400 Encryption

“The performance we are seeing with Alliance AES/400 encryption is excellent,” said Adam Bell, Senior Director of IT, Citizens Security Life Insurance. “The solution was easy to integrate and completely met our expectations.”

Alliance AES/400 FIELDPROC encryption is NIST-compliant and optimized for performance. The solution is up to 100x faster than equivalent IBM APIs on the IBM i platform.

With Alliance AES/400, businesses can encrypt and decrypt fields that store data such as credit card numbers, social security numbers, account numbers, ePHI, and other PII instantly without application changes.

Alliance Key Manager for VMware

Alliance Key Manager for VMWare was very easy to implement and the resources Townsend Security provided made deployment a smooth process,” continued Bell. By deploying Alliance Key Manager for VMware, CSLI was able to meet their business needs with a solution that could not only deploy quickly, but was also easy to set up and configure.

Alliance Key Manager for VMware leverages the same FIPS 140-2 compliant technology found in Townsend Security’s hardware security module (HSM) and in use by over 3,000 customers. The solution brings a proven and mature encryption key management solution to VMware environments, with a lower total cost of ownership. Additionally, the key manager has been validated to meet PCI DSS in VMware environments.

Integration with the IBM i Platform

An encryption strategy is only as good as the key management strategy, and it can be difficult to get key management right. For companies doing encryption, the most common cause of an audit failure is an improper implementation of key management. The seamless integration between Alliance AES/400 and the external Alliance Key Manager for VMware allowed CSLI to pass their data security audit with flying colors.

“The relationship we developed with Townsend Security enabled us to have a painless sales and support process, and in turn, enabled us to easily pass our data security audit,” finished Bell.

Meeting HIPAA and protecting ePHI with encryption and key management.

 

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Alliance AES/400, Case Study

How Do I Find and Start Alliance Key Manager for Encryption Key Management in AWS?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Sep 6, 2016 10:52:19 AM

For Amazon Web Services (AWS) users, encryption and key management has never been easier.  Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager uses the same FIPS 140-2 compliant key management technology found in the company's HSM and in use by over 3,000 customers worldwide. In the AWS Marketplace, there are two entries for Alliance Key Manager – one is for the fee-based implementation and one is for the Bring Your Own License (BYOL) implementation. Both are identical in their key management functionality. If you only need one or two instances of Alliance Key Manager you can use the fee-based entry in the marketplace. If you are going to use more than a couple of instances of the key manager you may want to use the Bring Your Own License entry to launch the key manager. There are discounts available for multiple instances of Alliance Key Manager and the BYOL version may be less expensive.

How to Meet Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS by Stephen WynkoopIf you are logged into your AWS account you can directly launch Alliance Key Manager from the marketplace. Both licensing models support a free 30-day license to use the key manager. 

Before launching, you should determine if you want to run the key manager in the public AWS cloud, or if you want to run the key manager in a virtual private cloud (VPC).  The AWS virtual private cloud platform provides more isolation from other cloud customers and therefore a bit more security, if that is desired.

As you launch Alliance Key Manager in the AWS cloud you will need to select a region in which to run the key manager. Alliance Key Manager supports all of the AWS regions and you can run it anywhere. Your choice of regions may reflect your estimate of where you will have the greatest demand, or where you want critical key material to reside.

Once your AWS instance of Alliance Key Manager has been launched you can open an SSH session to the key manager to perform initial set up. You will change your password, create a set of server and client PKI certificates, indicate whether this instance of the key server is a primary or secondary mirror server, and create some initial unique encryption keys. After answering these questions you will have a fully functional, dedicated EC2 instance of Alliance Key Manager ready to use.

Alliance Key Manager comes with a full suite of software development kits (SDKs) and documentation, but the marketplace is limited to three documents. After you launch your AWS instance of the key manager please contact Townsend Security to register and get access to the AKM Supplemental documentation.  Unless you register at the Townsend Security web site it will not be possible to contact you and send you the documentation. There is no charge for access to the documentation.

The AWS license comes with customer support at the Basic level. This provides technical support and software updates via email during business hours. A Premium Support options is available that provides telephone and web support and includes 24/7/365 support for business interruption issues. Please visit the Townsend Security web site for more information about the Premium Support option and to register your instance of Alliance Key Manager for AWS.

At Townsend Security we want to provide you with a positive experience with our key management products and provide you the support you deserve. When you run our Alliance Key Manager in AWS we won’t know who you are because Amazon does not report that information. By registering at the Townsend Security web site you get access to documentation, SDKs and free support. And we can keep you up to date on the latest security patches and enhancements!

You can find more information about Alliance Key Manager in AWS here.

How to Meet Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS by Stephen Wynkoop

 

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Amazon Web Services (AWS)

How Do I Encrypt Data and Manage Encryption Keys Using Java in Amazon Web Services (AWS)?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Aug 22, 2016 10:51:12 AM

If you are a Java developer you probably know that the Java language has full native support for AES encryption. You don’t need any third-party SDKs or add-ins to Java to use industry-standard, strong encryption. The standard Java APIs are based on industry standards and are very efficient. Don’t hesitate to use that built-in facility. You include it in your Java application like this:

import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.spec.IvParameterSpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;

Protecting Encryption Keys in AWSEncryption key management is another story. To implement good encryption key management you will need to turn to an enterprise key management solution and their Java library to make this happen. Our Alliance Key Manager for AWS solution provides a Java SDK to help you with encryption key use. The Alliance Key Manager Java SDK lets you easily retrieve an encryption key for use in your application, or alternatively to send data to Alliance Key Manager on a secure connection where the encryption or decryption task can be performed directly on the key server. This encryption service is helpful in situations where you don’t want to expose the encryption key in your application or server environment.

Many developers use the Java Keystore (JKS/JCEKS) facility for storing encryption keys. The Java key store is more a key storage facility rather than a key management facility and rarely meets compliance regulations for separating keys from the data they protect, providing for separation of duties, and dual control. If you are currently storing encryption keys in a JKS repository you may want to consider moving them to true key management solution like Alliance Key Manager.

One of the advantages of the Alliance Key Manager SDK is the built-in high availability failover facility. By using the Alliance Key Manager SDK in the event of a network or other failure you automatically fail over to a secondary HA key server in real-time. This means your application keeps running even though a network or system error prevents access to the primary key server.

The Java SDK for Alliance Key Manager includes all of the support needed to make a secure connection to the key server, retrieve an encryption key, access the encryption and decryption services on Alliance Key Manager, and perform other common functions. By using the SDK the Java developer can avoid writing all of the code needed to perform these tasks – the work needed to retrieve an encryption key is reduced to a few lines of code.  We think this is a big bonus for the Java developer and helps make their lives easier. And sample source code will really speed along the process.

Here is an extract of the sample source code showing the retrieval of an encryption key from Alliance Key Manager, an encryption of some plaintext, and the decryption of that ciphertext:

// Note: Full sample source available (this is just an extract)

import javax.crypto.Cipher;

import javax.crypto.spec.IvParameterSpec;

import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;


import com.townsendsecurity.akmcore.AkmException;

import com.townsendsecurity.akmcore.AkmUtil;

import com.townsendsecurity.akmcore.AkmRequest;


import com.townsendsecurity.akmkeys.AkmKeyRequest;

import com.townsendsecurity.akmkeys.AkmSymKey;


// The AKM configuration file

String sCfgFile = "/path/jakmcfg.xml"


// Create a key request object initialized from the configuration file

AkmKeyRequest keyRQ = null;

keyRQ = AkmKeyRequest.getInstance(sCfgFile);


// Define the key instance (version) name

String sInstance = "some-name"


// Retrieve the encryption key from Alliance Key Manager

AkmSymKey symkey = null;

symkey = keyRQ.retrieveSymKey(sKey, sInstance);


// Create a context

EncryptDecryptCBC cryptor = new EncryptDecryptCBC(symkey.getKeyBytes());


// Let’s encrypt some plaintext

byte[] ciphertext = null;

ciphertext = cryptor.encryptSymmetric(plaintext.getBytes());


// Let’s decrypt the ciphertext

byte[] plainbuf = null;

plainbuf = cryptor.decryptSymmetric(ciphertext);

There is no charge for the Java SDK and all Alliance Key Manager customers have access to the Java SDK and sample code. AWS customers must register on the Townsend Security web site to get access to the Java code. You can do that here.

Meeting Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Encryption Key Management, Enryption

How Can I Manage and Monitor Alliance Key Manager in Amazon Web Services (AWS)?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Aug 19, 2016 11:00:00 AM

Alliance Key Manager for AWS runs as a stand-alone EC2 virtual machine in the AWS cloud. This is an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas) implementation which means that the solution includes the operating system (Linux) and the key manager application all within the AMI and active EC2 instance. There are several ways you can manage and monitor the key server.

How to Meet Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS by Stephen WynkoopThe server components of Alliance Key Manager, such as the network interface, firewall, system logging, backup, and other operating system components are managed through a secure web browser interface. The secure browser session does not provide for management of encryption keys, but lets you perform various common server management tasks.

The Alliance Key Manager Administrative Console is a PC application that provides a GUI interface for the secure management of encryption keys and key access policy. You can manage multiple key managers through a single console instance and you can check the status of the key manager.

The Linux operating system of Alliance Key Manager provides a number of other ways to manage and monitor the key server. You can set firewall rules to control which client systems are authorized to access the key server, and you can set up system log forwarding to your log collection server or Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) solution running either inside or outside of AWS. Actively monitoring your security systems like Alliance Key Manager is a security best practice. You can easily monitor Linux system logs, web logs, firewall logs, and other system logs and transmit them to your SIEM log collection server.

Alliance Key Manager also creates audit and diagnostic logs that you can forward with the native syslog-ng daemon within the key manager. Every user and administrative access to Alliance Key Manager is logged to the audit file and errors are logged to the error log file. Both of these files should be forwarded to you SIEM log collection server.

Alliance Key Manager also implements a “NO-OP” command to provide for monitoring the up/down status of the key server. Your monitoring solution can periodically issue the No-Op command to the key server to determine the status of current key operations. The No-Op command is a lightweight transaction and you can safely monitor the status of the key server every few seconds if desired.

Many of our customers ask us if they can install third-party management and monitoring applications. In the past we’ve been restrictive about the installation of third party components, but we came to realize how important they are to many AWS customers. We now allow you to install these applications with the caveat that you must be responsible for their secure installation and deployment. Our customers are now installing applications like Chef and Nagios for active monitoring.

You should also be aware that Amazon provides a number of monitoring tools that you can use with any EC2 instance. One of the most common AWS monitoring tools is the Amazon CloudWatch.

You can use the CloudWatch facility to monitor the status of your Alliance Key Manager EC2 instance. This can help with early detection of potential problems.

Lastly, Alliance Key Manager is an API-driven enterprise key management solution. That is, all key management tasks that are performed from the Administrative Console can be performed from user applications or from the command line. In fact, the Administrative Console is built on these APIs. You can create your own applications that drive these functions without user intervention if you need to. This facility is very helpful for our partners who need to embed automated key management into their own AWS solutions.

You can find more information about Alliance Key Manager for AWS here.

How to Meet Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS by Stephen Wynkoop

Topics: Alliance Key Manager

Who Has Access to My Encryption Keys in Amazon Web Services (AWS)?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Aug 5, 2016 9:23:56 AM

One of the most common questions we get here at Townsend Security is something like “Who has access to my encryption keys in AWS?” It is a natural question to ask and it can be hard to determine the answer to this question with many key management solutions - including the key management services provided by Amazon. Let me try to answer this question for our Alliance Key Manager for AWS.

Protecting Encryption Keys in AWSAlliance Key Manager for AWS runs as a stand-alone EC2 instance in Amazon Web Services. There is no component of Alliance Key Manager that is shared by other users of AWS, and there is no component of Alliance Key Manager that uses encryption key management services provided by Amazon in AWS. Neither Amazon nor Townsend Security hold any credentials that grant access to the key manager solution, and there are no “backdoors” to the key manager. You, the AWS customer, solely and exclusively manage it.

Encryption keys in Alliance Key Manager are managed by the Alliance Key Manager Administrative Console. This is an application that you install on your PC and which accesses one or more instances of Alliance Key Manager in AWS. While you could install the administrative console in an EC2 instance in AWS, we recommend that you install it on a secure PC outside of AWS. You maintain full control over the application used to manage keys.

The administrative console connects to Alliance Key Manager over a secure TLS session using certificates that are issued by the Alliance Key Manager instance. That is, only administrators using PKI certificates known and authenticated by the specific key manager are allowed to perform management functions.

The use of encryption keys by applications or users inside of AWS or outside of AWS is likewise controlled by secure TLS sessions that are also validated to the specific key manager instance and certificate authority. Just having a valid certificate from Verisign or other certificate authority is not adequate to gain access to encryption keys.

An additional layer of encryption key access control allows you to restrict an encryption key to a user or group as defined on the client-side certificate. This level of key access control leverages to Common Name (CN) and Organizational Unit (OU) of the client-side certificate to control access to a key. If you specify that a key can only be accessed by user “Bill” in the group “Sales”, then Alliance Key Manager will inspect the connecting session to be sure that the certificate Common Name contains the value “Bill” and that the certificate Organizational Unit is “Sales”. Access is denied unless this rule is met.

Lastly, if an unauthorized user gains access to the Alliance Key Manager encryption key database they will not have access to the actual encryption keys. Data encryption keys (DEK) are encrypted by key encryption keys (KEK) which are stored separately. A stolen backup or copied key database file will be insufficient to gain access to the encryption keys.

You should be aware that any cloud service provider has low level access to your virtual machines and storage. That is true of Amazon’s cloud platform as it is with any other cloud platform. And you should also be aware that Amazon and other cloud service providers must obey the laws and regulations of the countries in which they operate. You cannot exclude the possibility that Amazon will provide access to your key management EC2 instance if required to do so under the law. In some countries this means that law enforcement organizations, national security agencies, and other governmental actors may have access to your encryption keys. And, while very unlikely, you cannot exclude the chance that an Amazon employee might make an unauthorized access to the EC2 instance of your key server. If these possibilities make you feel uncomfortable you should consider hosting your key management server outside of AWS. Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager solution can be hosted in your data center or in a hosting facility that you designate for this and provide keys to your AWS applications.

You can find more information about Alliance Key Manager for AWS here.

Meeting Best Practices for Protecting Information in AWS

 

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Encryption Key Management

When Encrypting Databases, Does Key Connection for SQL Server Cache the Encryption Key?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Jul 22, 2016 8:46:30 AM

Customers who need to encrypt data in Microsoft SQL Server databases know that they must protect the encryption key with appropriate controls to meet compliance regulations and to achieve safe harbor in the event of a data breach. Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager solution provides the Extensible Key Management (EKM) software to make proper key management a breeze. Called Key Connection for SQL Server, this EKM Provider software is installed on the server hosting the SQL Server database and it talks seamlessly to one or more Alliance Key Manager servers running in a separate server instance. Customers get proper key management that meets compliance regulations such as PCI-DSS in an easy-to-deploy solution.

Encryption-Key-Management-SQL-ServerPerformance is always a consideration when it comes to enabling encryption, so customers naturally ask us about key caching. Does Key Connection for SQL Server cache the encryption keys to enable better performance?

The short answer is Yes, it does.

How it does key caching depends on whether you use Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) or Cell Level Encryption (CLE). Let’s drill into each of these cases.

Transparent Data Encryption (TDE)
The implementation of TDE by Microsoft involves encrypting the entire table space and the database logs. It is the easiest type of encryption to deploy as it requires no changes to the actual application that uses the SQL Server database. You can implement TDE encryption by installing the Key Connection For SQL Server software and issuing four commands through the SQL Server management console. Restart logging to insure that it is encrypted and you are done.

So with TDE, how are keys managed? The TDE architecture involves SQL Server generating a symmetric key (usually a 256-bit AES key) and then asking Alliance Key Manager to encrypt it with an RSA key. This encrypted symmetric key is then stored on the server that hosts the SQL Server database. When you start SQL Server (or restart it, as the case may be) the SQL Server instance asks Alliance Key Manager to use RSA decryption to decrypt the symmetric key. Once that is complete the SQL Server instance has the key it needs and no longer needs to communicate with Alliance Key Manager. There is no need for key caching and the key will be decrypted the next time that SQL Server starts.

Cell Level Encryption (CLE)
The implementation of CLE by Microsoft SQL Server is quite different than for TDE. The EKM Provider software is still responsible for managing the symmetric encryption key, but it is accomplished in a different way. You must make small changes to your application SQL statements to request encryption and decryption of the cell contents. When CLE is activated the Key Connection for SQL Server software is called for each column and row that needs to be encrypted or decrypted. This means a lot more calls to the EKM Provider software and this is where key caching is very important.

The Key Connection for SQL Server software in this case does cache the symmetric encryption key (usually a 256-bit AES key) in order to improve performance. The key is cached using an equally strong RSA key to prevent key capture by malware. When SQL Server calls the Townsend Security EKM provider the software retrieves the key from the key server and will cache it locally for a 24 hour period. For the next 24 hours all subsequent requests for encryption or decryption are satisfied locally without the need to retrieve the key again. After 24 hours, the key is discarded and a fresh key is retrieved from the key server. If the connection to the key server is not available error messages are written to the Windows Event Log, but encryption processes will continue using the locally cached key, once the 24 hour period expires, network connectivity will need to be restored for a fresh key to be retrieved and operations restored. With key caching database encryption, performance is much better.

The architecture of the Alliance Key Manager EKM provider implements other core features needed to help protect your database. These include:

  • Separation of Duties between Key Administrators and Database Administrators
  • Dual Control for key management operations
  • Built-in logging to the Windows Event Manager
  • High availability failover to one or more secondary key servers
  • Automatic recovery of failed EKM Provider services
  • Security of credentials through Windows Certificate Store
  • Easy key rollover using native SQL Server commands

Key caching is important for performance, but this is just one part of an overall key management strategy for Microsoft SQL Server.

As customers move to virtualized and cloud environments, Alliance Key Manager and the Key Connection for SQL Server EKM Provider software will move with you. In addition to traditional IT data centers, all Townsend Security encryption and key management solutions run in VMware (vSphere, ESXi, etc.), Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, and in any cloud service provider vCloud environment.

Encryption and Key Management for Microsoft SQL Server

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, SQL Server

MongoDB and Encryption Key Management for Compliance

Posted by Patrick Townsend on May 9, 2016 1:00:00 AM

MongoDB: Encryption Best Practies

As the importance of encryption increases across the regulatory spectrum, it is heartening to see database vendors implementing encryption and encryption key management that meet security best practices. MongoDB Enterprise is one of the most popular modern databases and has given its customers the ability to quickly and effectively implement encryption and good key management at the level of the database itself. This means that MongoDB Enterprise customers can transparently implement encryption directly in the database without deploying third party file or volume based encryption products to accomplish this task. MongoDB customers enjoy rapid deployment of encryption, a unified management interface to the database, high performance encryption, and integrated encryption key management based on the industry standard Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP).

Securing Data in MongoDB podcastBy basing key management on the OASIS KMIP standard MongoDB is providing real benefits to their customers. These include:

  • Rapid implementation of key management with no need for developer resources.
  • No requirement for server-side software libraries, updates, and patching.
  • Secure encryption key retrieval services based on TLS.
  • Vendor neutrality for encryption key management services.
  • Vendor portability and avoidance of vendor lock-in.
  • Seamless migration from one key management solution to another.

MongoDB Enterprise is a case-study in the benefits of using open standards for encryption and key management. MongoDB’s customers can choose the key management solution that makes the most sense for them, and having choices reduces the cost of encryption key management.

MongoDB: Encryption Key Management Made Easy

Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager solution works out of the box with MongoDB Enterprise to help customers meet compliance regulations which require encryption of sensitive data. It takes just a few minutes to deploy Alliance Key Manager and to configure MongoDB for key management. On first boot, Alliance Key Manager creates a set of strong encryption keys including a 256-bit AES key that can be used with MongoDB, and it creates a set of PKI certificates used for TLS authentication. The PKI certificates are copied to the MongoDB server to secure the connection to the key manager. A quick command or two from the MongoDB command line console and, Voila! Your MongoDB encryption key is now fully protected by a key encryption key on Alliance Key Manager. You have an encrypted MongoDB database and a highly redundant and recoverable encryption key management infrastructure. From the technical team at MongoDB:

“The encryption occurs transparently in the storage layer; i.e. all data files are fully encrypted from a file system perspective, and data only exists in an unencrypted state in memory and during transmission.”

After installing the key manager certificates on the server hosting the MongoDB database, here is an example of the command to enable encryption:

mongod --enableEncryption --kmipServerName akmmongo --kmipServerCAFile /etc/mongodb-kmip/AKMRootCACertificate.pem --kmipClientCertificateFile /etc/mongodb-kmip/AKMClientCertificate.pem --dbpath /var/lib/mongodb/

It’s that simple.

With Alliance Key Manager you have your choice of network-attached hardware security modules (HSMs), VMware virtual machines, and dedicated cloud instances in Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. The key manager works the same way in all environments so you can even mix and match hardware, VMs, and cloud instances to achieve the level of security that is right for your organization. All instances of Alliance Key Manager are dedicated to you with no access by cloud service providers or third parties. Key custody remains exclusively under your control.

Many MongoDB customers deploy the database in VMware environments. Alliance Key Manager also runs in VMware as a virtual machine. You can deploy the key manager in a VMware security group and protect one or more instances of MongoDB across the entire VMware environment. If you are running on a VMware vCloud platform the same support is provided for key management.

For compliance, Alliance Key Manager is validated for PCI-DSS compliance in the VMware platform. This will help you achieve PCI-DSS compliance for your MongoDB database and applications. The PCI-DSS statement of compliance is here.

MongoDB is rapidly becoming the high performance, scalable, NoSQL database of choice for organizations large and small. As such it becomes a part of the critical infrastructure for business applications. Alliance Key Manager also implements high availability features such as automatic, real-time encryption key mirroring, and backup. For customers deploying the hardware version of Alliance Key Manager, there is redundancy at the hardware level with dual hot-swappable RAID disks, redundant power supplies, and redundant network interfaces. All of these features mean that your key management infrastructure will be resilient and reliable.

Alliance Key Manager will help you will meet common compliance regulations such as PCI-DSS, HIPAA, FFIEC, FISMA, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and other compliance schemes. Alliance Key Manager regardless of platform is based on the same FIPS 140-2 compliant software found in our enterprise level HSM. With no restrictions or license costs for client-side connections, you can protect as many MongoDB databases as you like with one Alliance Key Manager.

The product team at MongoDB did a great job of implementing encryption and key management for their customers. They deserve to be applauded for basing their solution on industry standards like KMIP. This will lower the bar for getting encryption right in the database. With Alliance Key Manager, getting encryption right means rapid deployment, conservation of developer resources, lower administration costs, and provable compliance.

A match made in techno-heaven.

Patrick

Securing Data in MongoDB

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Compliance, MongoDB Encryption, MongoDB Encryption Key Management, MongoDB

Does Alliance Key Manager Support Rolling Keys and How Does it Work?

Posted by Patrick Townsend on Aug 18, 2015 2:30:00 PM

Periodically changing the encryption key for protected data is a security best practice and a part of many compliance regulations like the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).

This encryption key change is sometimes referred to as “Key rotation” or “Key rollover” and these terms mean the same thing. When performing a key change operation you generate a new encryption key, decrypt the protected data with the old encryption key, and then encrypt the data with the new encryption key. After the defined cryptoperiod for the key you archive or escrow the key and it is no longer be used.encryption-key-management-simplified

More Information:
There are several factors involved in defining the cryptoperiod for a key. If you want to know more about defining cryptoperiods, you can get a good description in the NIST Special Publication 800-57 Part 1, “Key Management Best Practices”, section 5.3. 

Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager helps you with key rollover by allowing you to specify a cryptoperiod for any symmetric key, and then automatically generating a new key for you at the end of the cryptoperiod. In Alliance Key Manager the cryptoperiod is specified as the number of days from the key creation date. At midnight on the last day of the cryptoperiod, a new version of the key is created and it becomes the default encryption key. The old key is retained and is fully active so that data can still be decrypted with that key.

Like most enterprise key management solutions Alliance Key Manager provides a user-friendly name for an encryption key, and a version identifier. The key name is a normal character name and might be something like Credit card, Human resources, and so forth. The name is meant to provide an easy way for a user or security administrator to locate and use a key.

In Alliance Key Manager the version of the key is called the “Key instance” and is a unique character string. When managing keys the key instance name might look something like this: TGV0IGZyZWVkb20gcmluZw==. Key instance names are always unique and a key may have any number of key instances.

The most recent version of the key is the default, or current, instance of the key. When you retrieve a key in your application, you can leave the key version blank and you will automatically get the most current version of the key. When Alliance Key Manager performs key rollover the new version of the key becomes the current version of the key.

Alliance Key Manager supports three rollover settings for each symmetric key:

  • Automatic key rollover at the interval you specify
  • Manual rollover that you initiate through the security console
  • No key rollover

Whatever key rollover strategy you decide to implement, Alliance Key Manager will provide the tools you need. You can fully automate key rollover, roll keys manually at your convenience, or dis-allow key rollover so that new versions of the key are never generated.

Encryption Key Management Simplified eBook

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Encryption Key Management

PCI DSS Requirements 3

Posted by Luke Probasco on Jul 22, 2015 12:52:00 PM

NIck Trenc - CoalfireThis is a guest blog by Nick Trenc, CISSP, QSA, PA-QSA, VCP.  Nick is an IT Security Architect at Coalfire Labs.


For those protecting the front lines of our credit card data in merchant environments, few other things keep those in charge (as well as IT administrators) awake at night than the threat of a breach. Questions often arise along the lines of: Will my company be able to survive? What can I do to protect myself? How do I prevent my company from being next? And how do I limit any losses should it happen to us?

VMware Encryption Key Management PCIOne of the key components to the protection of cardholder data at any merchant location is the use of strong cryptography along with just-as-strong cryptographic key management procedures. PCI DSS Requirement 3 outlines what the PCI council believes to be the baseline for strong cryptographic key management procedures and is a key element of any PCI DSS audit.

Successful key management with a strong cryptographic algorithm is the best place to start with getting encryption of your cardholder data correctly protected while it is contained within your environment. But key management can be confusing, difficult and downright impossible depending on the size of your environment. Figuring out if your keys are strong enough, or if they are rotated often enough or if they are protected from would-be hackers. On top of that, figure in the ever-increasing complexity of today’s business systems to include cloud, virtual computing, data mining, and others, the ability to quickly and easy manage encryption keys across several platforms and environments becomes key for PCI DSS compliance.

This is where a tool like Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager (AKM) comes in to play. Available as a physical hardware security module (HSM), a cloud HSM, a virtual appliance (VMware) or in the cloud (AWS, Azure), Alliance Key Manager can help merchants meet PCI DSS requirements for encryption key management by creating, managing, and distributing AES 128-bit, 192-bit or 256-bit encryption keys all without the risks involved with clear-text key administration.

As a QSA, it is certainly encouraging to see a complete encryption solution that removes some of the worries of traditional manual clear-text key management procedures. AKM can relieve pressure to meet portions of PCI DSS Requirement 3 such as the need to render Personal Account Numbers (PAN) unreadable using strong cryptography with associated key-management processes and procedures (PCI DSS 3.4). It directly meets PCI DSS Requirement 3.5.2 to store keys within a secure cryptographic devices such as a HSM along with additional encryption requirements such as 3.6.2 – Secure Key Distribution, and 3.6.3 – Secure Key Storage. In addition, AKM can make PCI DSS Requirements 3.6.6 for Split Knowledge and Dual Control not applicable as there are no manual key-management operations involved. This (virtual) device is a useful cost-effective tool to help meet your PCI DSS compliance.

For more information on using AKM to meet PCI DSS compliance specifically within a virtual environment (but also applicable to most environments), please see the VMware Product Applicability Guide for PCI DSS 3.0 published by Coalfire Systems with collaboration with Townsend Security and VMware.

VMware Encryption Key Management PCI DSS

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, VMware

Encryption and Key Management – “Bring Your Own” to the Cloud

Posted by Michelle Larson on Jun 11, 2015 9:56:00 AM

In this age of “Bring Your Own”, we see the acronyms BYOD (device), BYOE (encryption), and BYOK (key) showing up all over the blog-o-sphere. BYOK is a cloud computing security model that allows cloud service customers to use the provided server-side encryption software and (bring) manage their own encryption keys.Click to request the webinar: Encryption & Key Management Everywhere Your Data Is

The idea of encryption (cryptography) is almost as old as the concept of written language: if a message might fall into enemy hands, then it is important to ensure that they will not be able to read it. Most typically, encryption relies on some sort of "key" to unlock and make sense of the message it contains, and that transfers the problem of security to a new level – now the message is secure, the focus shifts to protecting the key. In the case of access to cloud services, if we are encrypting data because we are worried about its security in an unknown cloud, then why would we trust the same cloud to hold the keys without using a key management solution?

BYOK can help an organization that wishes to take advantage of cloud services to address both regulatory compliance and data privacy concerns in a third-party multi-tenant environment. This approach allows a customer to use the encryption technology that best suits the customer's needs, including the cloud provider's underlying IT infrastructure. For example, Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3) is about protecting data-at-rest using server-side encryption with customer-provided encryption keys (SSE-C) or “BYOK”. With the encryption key you provide as part of your data request, Amazon S3 then manages the encryption (as it writes to disks) and decryption (when you access your data). You don't need to maintain any code to perform data encryption and decryption in S3. The only thing you do is manage the encryption keys you provide to the Amazon Simple Storage Service. When you upload an object, Amazon S3 uses the encryption key you provide to apply AES-256 encryption to your data and then removes the encryption key from memory. When you retrieve data, you must provide the same encryption key as part of your data request. Amazon S3 first verifies that the encryption key you provided matches, and then decrypts the data before returning it to you.

Important to Note: Amazon S3 does not store the encryption key you provide. Instead, they store a randomly salted HMAC value of the encryption key in order to validate future requests. The salted HMAC value cannot be used to derive the value of the encryption key or to decrypt the contents of the encrypted object. That means, if you lose the encryption key, you lose the object.

Any time a company decides it wants to host its applications in the cloud, or use a SaaS application where the company’s data will be stored in the cloud, their IT security professionals have to ask a series of questions.

    • Can we encrypt the data? If so, who will have access to the keys?
    • How will we perform key rotation and manage the lifecycle of the encryption keys?
    • Is the cloud vendor using a proprietary encryption technology that prevents us from moving our data to another vendor?
    • If we use 10 SaaS applications, will we have to administrate 10 different key management solutions?

These questions are tough enough to answer when the data and encryption technologies are in a company’s own data center where it has complete control over everything. In many cases, if encryption is provided, the cloud provider holds or has access to the keys, which creates another set of problems for the end user. For one thing, a third-party having access to data in the clear is a violation of regulations such as PCI-DSS, HIPAA, GLBA and others. Also, customers have yet to establish trust in cloud platforms or SaaS providers to protect their data. There have been many high profile data breaches that make end-users nervous. Customers also fear the U.S. government will subpoena access to their data without their knowledge or permission. For companies outside the U.S. that choose to use a U.S.-hosted cloud or app, there are data privacy and residency concerns. Instinctively it feels a lot more secure to manage your own key and use BYOK instead of leaving it to the cloud provider.

A few things have become crystal clear:

  1. You need to know where your sensitive information is. Period.
  2. You need to know who has access to it. Not who you think has access to it, but who really has access to it.
  3. Wherever you put your sensitive information, you need to protect it. The most critical thing you need to do is to apply a strong defense in depth approach to data security, including the use of encryption and access controls.
  4. You need to be able to document, through audit logs and reports, who has actually accessed your information. This is true (and important) for sensitive data, as well as for compliance-regulated data.
  5. If you think that having your cloud service provider encrypt your data provides adequate security for your information, you probably need to rethink this.

It all boils down to this: When encrypted data is stored or processed in the cloud, the data and the keys must be kept separate and only the end-user should control the encryption keys.

Cloud storage options bring new economies and business efficiencies, but security can’t be ignored, and it can’t be simply outsourced to some other party. We believe that it is fundamental to good security to control all access to your data, including managing your own encryption keys. Managing encryption keys may sound daunting, but it doesn’t need to be. Our technology makes data security and encryption key management simple and straightforward. Our key management solution addresses all of the issues described above and can protect your data everywhere you have it stored.

Request the webinar: Encryption & Key Management Everywhere Your Data Is

Topics: Alliance Key Manager, Encryption, Encryption Key Management, Webinar, Cloud Security


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